http://mramerica.fitproconnect.com/Image/bacolumn3160.jpg http://mramerica.fitproconnect.com/Image/bacolumn2160.jpg http://mramerica.fitproconnect.com/Image/bacolumn1160.jpg
Friend and Follow Me!
This Month In Life
  • Diagnosing True Emergencies
    Your baby has a high fever, your son’s ankle hurts to walk on, or your husband is having chest pain. You don’t want to pay the high costs of emergency room care, but you also want to get the help you need. How do you know where to go? Read >>
  • Here, Kitty, Kitty
    Leave the butter on the counter or a bowl of leftover cereal milk on the table and what happens? If you’ve got a cat in the house, that food will likely be gone. But what if your cat gets into food that’s unsafe? To protect the health of your pet cats, it’s important to know which foods are safe and which aren’t. Read >>
  • More Than the Baby Blues
    For nearly 10 months you were looking forward to a new addition to your family, but now that baby’s here you’re having mixed emotions. While there was initially joy and excitement with a little anxiety mixed in, you’re now struggling with feelings of sadness and depression. Is is baby blues or something more? Read >>
  • Can’t Sleep?
    Head to the pharmacy and you’ll find plenty of over-the-counter medications to help you get a good night’s sleep—at least for a while. But is a sleeping pill the best way to deal with your sleep problem? Don’t they, like all medications, come with risks? Read >>
Health and Fitness News

More Than the Baby Blues

What is postpartum depression and how is it treated?

Yes, childbirth is tough, but the end result of a healthy newborn makes it all worth it. For nearly 10 months you were looking forward to a new addition to your family, but now that baby’s here you’re having mixed emotions. While there was initially joy and excitement with a little anxiety mixed in, you’re now struggling with feelings of sadness and depression.

Mood swings in the first few days following the birth of a baby are common. Often called the “baby blues,” you’re tired, cry a lot, and feel anxious. These feelings typically last a couple weeks and then you start to feel normal again. But what if you don’t? What if the feelings of sadness and depression don’t go away but actually get worse? It may be more than the baby blues.

A form of depression called postpartum depression (PPD) affects an estimated 10 percent of new moms. The good news is that PPD can be treated and you can enjoy motherhood like you expected.

What to Look For

Are you depressed or just exhausted from lack of sleep and the stress of caring for a newborn? Sometimes it’s hard to tell the difference. When you blame your emotions on the baby blues but notice your symptoms are worsening and hindering your ability to care for your child, you may be dealing with postpartum depression.

A woman suffering from PPD may cry a lot, seem fine one minute then feel despair the next, have trouble bonding with the baby, seem hungry all the time, or have a lack of appetite. Some women may withdraw from family and friends or find no interest in the things that once brought them enjoyment. They may feel like a failure, feel inadequate as a mother, and have trouble making decisions.

PPD can get so severe that women have thoughts of harming themselves or their baby. It’s important to note that in some cases, PPD begins during pregnancy or doesn’t kick in until six months after birth. Left untreated, this depression can last for months or even years.

Why These Feelings?

You dreamed of the joys of having a baby so why are you so sad? PPD is the result of a combination of emotional, hormonal, genetic, and environmental factors over which you have no control. After pregnancy, your body’s hormonal balance is disrupted and some women are more sensitive to the changes in estrogen and progesterone. In addition, you’re sleep-deprived from the baby’s frequent night feedings and you’re stressed from caring for a tiny human being.

Women who go through a traumatic birth experience, are going through stressful times, previously suffered with depression or anxiety, don’t have the support of family or friends, or have trouble with breastfeeding are the most likely to deal with PPD.

Where to Turn for Help

Don’t wait for the feelings to go away on their own. Call your doctor as soon as you recognize symptoms of postpartum depression. Treatment for PPD is the same as that for normal depression —a combination of mental health counseling and possibly medication. Taking antidepressant medication while breastfeeding is generally considered safe for the baby, and it typically takes three to four weeks for you to notice improvements on the medicine. Feeling better, however, is not a sign you should stop taking your medication as doing so could cause a relapse. Be sure to work closely with your physician for your treatment plan.

About Training with Mr. America
About my programs: Mr. America Jason Kozma's Personal Training is a triple threat of body shaping weight workouts, precision fat-loss cardio and holistic nutrition using regular foods. Using his system, you can radically upgrade your fitness, health appearance and self-confidence. Clients routinely shed 20 pounds of body fat in eight weeks or less, increase their strength and flexibility, and achieve extreme cardiovascular fitness.

Even if you've never had success losing fat or gaining muscle before, my individually tailored program will work for you! Call now at (310) 772-5105 and find out how quickly you can get in the best shape of your life!

Visit Jason's website at www.smpersonaltraining.com !